Magdalene

Moments of Meeting and the Problem of Shame

A One-Day Seminar with Dr. Patricia DeYoung

90.00 Add to Cart

When: 18 February, 2017

Where: The River Lee Hotel, Western Road, Cork

The problem of shame is ubiquitous in psychotherapy, as it is in life, but it is often misunderstood. Both those who suffer from chronic shame and those who treat their suffering may understand the problem as rooted in an individual’s low self-esteem or faulty patterns of thought or belief. In Understanding and Treating Chronic Shame: A Relational/Neurobiological Approach, Dr. Pat DeYoung has argued that chronic shame is rooted, instead, in early relational experience, and that therefore the essence of treating shame should also be relational.

Dr. Patricia DeYoung
Dr. Patricia DeYoung

This day-long training expands on that premise, beginning with a paper that argues for the “fit” between the several traditions of relational therapy and the moments of person-to-person meeting that shame needs for healing. In treating shame, empathic attunement and active, transparent engagement are not rival approaches; both are essential. With this perspective as background, Dr. DeYoung will present a set of two talks. In the first, she will trace how shame’s power of self-disintegration interacts with dissociative and compensatory self-protections to create recognizable “faces of shame.” In the second, she will discuss ways that therapists can find and create moments of meeting within the quite different kinds of interpersonal fields these faces of shame construct. She will condense key points into “self-supervision guidelines for working with shame,” which will provide the framework for a final hour of conversation between Dr. DeYoung and a fellow therapist who brings a case for discussion.

 

 

Past Events

Things of Darkness: An Exploration of Human Violence

A one-day seminar with Dr. Gwen Adshead, Forensic Psychiatrist and Psychotherapist

When: 3rd September 2016

Where: The River Lee Hotel, Western Road, Cork

Dr. Gwen Adshead
Dr. Gwen Adshead

This event is designed to illuminate why human beings can be dangerous, murderous, or perverse and draws on Dr. Adshead’s long-standing and extensive experience of working therapeutically with perpetrators of violence and cruelty. It an opportunity for professionals who encounter acts of violence, aggression and sadism in their clinical work, to both contextualise their work and consider strategies for dealing with those dynamics. This seminar will also be of interest to academics, social workers, probation and prison officers, law enforcement professionals, and any other professionals who study or encounter violence or perpetrators of violence in their work.

 

Using the Self in Psychotherapy

An experiential workshop with Diana Shmukler, Phd.

“It’s all about you and nothing to do with you at the same time.”

25th June, 2016 at The Imperial Hotel, Cork

Dr. Diana Shmukler
Dr. Diana Shmukler

Contemporary approaches to relationally-oriented work such as psychotherapy, counselling or supervision require that we use ourselves as the primary tool. This presupposes an ongoing self-awareness and a commitment to self-reflection and growth. There is also a need to acquire an understanding of a psychology of relationship, relational difficulties, as well as trauma. In any perspective which rests on an understanding of psychodynamics, ongoing consideration must be given to transference and countertransference issues. Thus, the processes of projection, projective identification and introjection are critical to our discussion.

This workshop will consist of a combination of theory and practice and theory related to practice. Dr. Shmukler believes that we learn and can best use ideas and techniques when we relate them to ourselves and our situations. Further, she believes one of our deep motivations for this work is the opportunity for self-development and growth inherent in working with ourselves. Thus, she will use the group as a learning group. There will also be an opportunity for supervision and to explore cases as well as participants’ experiences, in the present, in the group.